12th Ljudevit Jurak International Symposium on
Comparative Pathology
Zagreb
June 1-2, 2001
 

POSTER PRESENTATION
IMMUNOHISTOCHEMICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF CELLULAR INFILTRATE IN CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM OF PIGS WITH EXPERIMENTAL CLASSICAL SWINE FEVER
P. J. Sanchez-Cordón, I. Garca de Leaniz, E. Ruiz-Villamor* S. Romanini, F.J. Salguero, J.C. Gómez-Villamandos
Department of Veterinary Pathology, University of Córdoba, Cordoba, Spain
*Laboratorio Central de Veterinaria, Santa Fe, Granada, Spain
INTRODUCTION & AIM:
Classical swine fever (CSF) is characterised by nervous clinical signs and perivascular cell infiltration in the central nervous system. However, the characterisation of this infiltration has not been carried out yet. In this paper we have developed an immunohistochemical study to determine the nature of cellular infiltrate an the its relation with the viral antigen.
MATERIAL & METHODS:
44 pigs were inoculated by  the intramuscular route with CSF virus and killed 2 days post-inoculation (dpi) to 23 dpi. 4 animals were used as uninfected controls. Samples of different intestinal areas were fixed in formalin, Bouinís solution and glutaraldehyde (2í5%) and routinely processed for a histopathological and ultrastructural study. An immunohistochemical study with antibodies against gp55 HCV, T cells (CD3, CD4, CD8), B cells (? chains) and macrophages (MAC387, SWC3) was developed according to the ABC technique. 
RESULTS & CONCLUSION:
The histopathological study revealed mononuclear perivascular infiltrate from 4-5 dpi, which was more abundant in the cerebellum although it showed a diffused distribution. The immunohistochemical study revealed that this infiltrate was homogeneous in the experiment and it was constituted mainly of  
lymphocytes and a few B cells and macrophages. The percentage of CD4 and CD8 cells was similar. Viral antigen was detected in mononuclear circulating cells, perivascular cells (lymphocytes and macrophages) and a few endothelial cells, in this case at the middle and final phases of the experiment.

This paper has been supported by a grant from DGESIC (PB981033)

Poster Presentation