12th Ljudevit Jurak International Symposium on
Comparative Pathology
Zagreb
June 1-2, 2001
 

ABSTRACT
INFLAMMATORY BOWEL DISEASES IN THE COURSE OF SERONEGATIVE SPONDARTHRITIDES
H.G. Fassbender
Zentrum für Rheuma-Pathologie, Mainz, Germany
The inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), including Crohn’s disease, colitis ulcerosa, and Whipple’s disease, get their specific profile through  knotting with disorders of joints and tendons. But the fact that only in 17-20 % of cases peripheral and in 5-12 % axial structures are affected argues for the presence of additional genetic factors which determine the involvement of a joint. Localization and symptomatology of the joint processes in IBD share characteristics with the seronegative spondarthritides (SSA). They are marked by painful synovitides which, however, do not destroy the joint. Generally, they subside after approximately 6 weeks, but they tend to relapse.
IBD, complicated by peripheral arthritis, is not associated with HLA-B27, but with axial involvement, however, in 33-71 %.In 60-80% of patients the occurrence of a reactive arthritis in combination with enteritides, triggered by Shigella, Salmonella, or Yersinia enterocolitica, is connected with HLA-B27. The knotting between IBD and joint diseases is of general rheumatologic importance because it throws light on the role of the enteral lymphoid tissue in the development of immunologic processes, and, on the other hand, shows the specific disposition of the synovial membrane to react to systemic immunologic disturbances with a non-erosive synovitis.
Program