12th Ljudevit Jurak International Symposium on
Comparative Pathology
Zagreb
June 1-2, 2001
 

ABSTRACT
ASCORBINEMIA AND SERUM CHOLINESTERASE ACTIVITY IN PIGLETS AFTER PARENTERAL ADMINISTRATION OF ASCORBIC ACID
D. Curcæ, V. Andronie, M. Codreanu
Department of Physiopathology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Bucharest, Romania
The importance of ascorbic acid for domestic animals is proved by following benefits: it promotes healthy capillaries, aids iron absorption, helps heal wounds and broken bones, treats anemia (especially for iron-deficiency anemia), treats urinary tract infections, helps form collagen in connective tissue, increases iron absorption in the intestines, contributes to hemoglobin and red blood cell production in bone marrow, blocks production of nitrosamines.
Ascorbic acid and its interaction with other substances: anti-cholinergics  decrease anti-cholinergic effect; anti-coagulants (oral)  decrease anti-coagulant effect; aspirin and barbiturates decrease ascorbic acid (vitamin C) effect; iron supplements  increase iron effect.
Animals of different age  and mainly piglets are reported to be able to synthetize a sufficient amount of ascorbic acid from glucose in their gut in order to satisfy their requirements. However, it has been suggested that the ascorbic acid requirement was increased during the reproductive period. More recently dietary supplementation of ascorbic acid was found to exert different effects on the growth rate of weanling and fattening pigs.
Young animals seemed to be more sensitive to supplementation during particular periods such as weaning. In fact, large variations observed between experiments could be associated with the experimental conditions such as: age of the animals or the period of life, length of the experiment, housing conditions, level of supply and stability of the ascorbic acid in the diet.
A study was made regarding the total blood level of ascorbic acid (AA) using the Roe and Kuether method; and of serum cholinesterase activity (PChE) using the Ellman et al. method, in hypothrepsic piglets, after parenteral administration of ascorbic acid, as compared with untreated piglets and with clinically healthy congeners. Ascorbic acid, 10% solution, was given i.m. 0,25 g/day for 4 succesive days to hypothrepsic piglets at birth, 10 days and at 20 days after birth.
Following parenteral administration of AA a 129.44% rise in ascorbinemia was found in the treated piglets against their clinically healthy congeners, and a 320,98% rise against the untreated hypothrepsic piglets. Serum cholinesterase activity rose 14.47% against the untreated hypothrepsic piglets.
After the administration of AA a 232.83% rise in ascorbinemia was found in 14 day old hypothrepsic piglets against the clinically healthy congeners, and a 180.49% rise against the untreated hypothrepsic piglets. Serum cholinesterase activity dropped 21.22% against the untreated hypothrepsic piglets, and 37.80% against the clinically healthy congeners.
In  24-day old hypothrepsic piglets given AA a 165.16% rise in ascorbinemia was found against the untreated hypothrepsic piglets and a 120.39% rise against the clinically healthy congeners. Serum cholinesterase activity was 31.58% lower against the untreated hypothrepsic piglets and 25.53% lower against the clinically healthy congeners.
The results also reveal the existence of a relatively wide variation of ascorbinemia and serum cholinesterase activity in suckling piglets, depending on age, state of health, and parenteral administration of AA.
Program